New CISO at Target

Photo Courtesy of Target

Photo Courtesy of Target

Target named its new CISO today. Brad Maiorino will fill a newly created post called senior vice president and chief information security officer. When the Target search began, I shared the comment with several other security analysts wondering who would want that job. Apparently, Mr. Maiorino, who comes from General Motors and General Electric where he held similar positions, wants it. I imagine he feels excited about the opportunity to rebuild a security program with a substantial budget and likely a wide latitude. Plus, any breaches occuring in the first six months or so could easily be blamed on the previous administration. That gives him a year of smooth sailing and liberal spending. After that, the rubber hits the road and he will be on trial more than most CISOs.

The Snowden conversation we are all having in one way or another…

Edward Snowden (source Wikipedia)

Edward Snowden (source Wikipedia)

Edward Snowden did one important thing: He made an important conversation on security and ethics popular and international.

One one hand, he told us something we always knew: Spies spy. That is, stealthily gathering secrets, usually associated with times of war or matters of national security, is the third(?) oldest profession.  :-)
Spying on specific national interests is assumed, expected, and probably universal, which is why the feigned indignation of global leaders is laughable.
However, spying on a populous is extreme. Spying is normal when its targets are decision makers, influencers and information handlers. Regular citizens, though, don’t qualify for surveillance unless they are associated in some other way with a security threat.
  • Surveillance of a high crime street corner is appropriate
  • Surveillance of a shoplifting-prone market is appropriate
  • Surveillance of military leaders engaged in assault on national interests is expected
  • Yet, combing private communications, collecting information that may someday be factored as a risk – destroys the fabric of trust between a people and its government. 
Therefore, surveillance in itself is morally neutral, neither good nor bad. Sometimes it’s downright necessary for security or loss prevention. It’s a simple formula: Analyze meta data, identify risks, manage risks.
This surveillance and spying conversation, however, sends shivers down the backs of security managers and executives.
My recent informal research shows that security executives are Least Aware of physical threats to information. Every security executive we’ve interviewed had an understanding of physical threats to information (unauthorized visitors, dumpster diving, etc) but almost none had studied or measured the risks associated with physical threats to information, nor did they have in place thorough procedures to protect against it.
…and Least Prepared for Social engineering and physical penetration.  Every security executive confessed that confidential company information was as risk of social engineer attacks (phony phone conversations, pre-texting, impersonation, spear-phishing, etc.).  Physical penetrations were even more frightening to some executives who were certain that their confidential company information could be collected and conveyed out of the building (in the form of printed documents, photos, memory sticks, etc) by
  • an unauthorized visitor tailgating into the building
  • an attacker bypassing security controls at doors and fences
  • rogue employees or contractors (a la Snowden)
  • an internal attacker of any type
We are all in this discussion now, public and private organizations, data and physical infrastructures. Now tell me your opinion. Do you think the “Snowden affair” is relevant to your organization?  Is it a physical security issue? A cybersecurity issue? Both? Something different?
(Published by Steve Hunt previously on SecurityCurrent.com)
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Reinventing the security perimeter

It’s time to register for my upcoming GigaOm Research webinar. The Modern Perimeter & More – countering Advanced Security Threats.

http://research.gigaom.com/webinar/the-modern-perimeter-and-more-countering-advanced-security-threats/

Categories: Uncategorized

How Spring Cleaning May Create New Information Risks

Categories: Uncategorized

Threats Everywhere at RSA 2014

February 28, 2014 Leave a comment

If you’ve ever been to the IT security mega trade show, RSA Conference, you probably noticed the same thing. There is always a dominant theme. One year it is compliance. Another identity theft. This year, loud and clear, it was threat management. Some vendors, like Skybox Security and Core Security, showed that their products helped you predict and prepare for threats. Some, like Intel/McAfee, Kaspersky were all about detecting threats quickly as they are being exploited. Others, for example BalaBit and LogRhythm, help you to understand threats in context as they occur.

Threats here. Threats there. Threats everywhere.

The threat management vendors were having a heyday, but they weren’t alone. All the other vendors joined the fun. Entrust, an identity management vendor recently acquired by Datacard, told us that threats make us so vulnerable because our identity management is lacking. Firewall vendors CheckPoint and Palo Alto Networks reminded us that they were the original threat fighters. And RSA’s Archer product team said that threats are best managed with top flight governance, risk and compliance (GRC) software.

I wondered how an average security director could walk the aisles of the show floor, listen to the vendor pitches, and have any clue what products to buy. Two vendors may use nearly the same expressions to describe their wares, but sell products that are fundamentally different.

I see it from the vendor’s point of view. They want to get in on the spending spree happening around threat management these days. I hope they realize that as soon as they start using generic threat management language – as they all seemed to do – they increase their number of competitors to include every other vendor using the same language.

I liked the pitch I heard from Rick Gamache, CTO of Red Sky Alliance. His words stood out from the crowd with a fresh approach. Red Sky Alliance is just that, an alliance. In two years it has rapidly grown to over thirty member companies, including major banks, huge Internet retailers, an oil & gas company, and a smattering of others. In an alliance of high trust, members share with one another threats they are experiencing. Then the dedicated researchers at Red Sky Alliance and its associate, Wapack Labs, provide a deep analysis of the threat – the most thorough analysis of advanced persistent threats (APTs) available outside of government agencies, accompanied by actionable recommendations for mitigating all related threats. The members use that analysis to defend against any other attacks coming from the same Chinese, Russian or other sources.

Good luck to CISOs in their quest to manage threats. My advice is to listen with a critical ear and get customer references from their peers.

 

 

Categories: Event Management

SecurityDreamer Trends Report

February 14, 2013 11 comments

security_dreamer_high-res_4c

Overview

Each year since 2005, SecurityDreamer blogger and industry analyst, Steve Hunt, conducts surveys of end user security executives, tracking trends related to the business of security. We cover physical security and IT security equally at SecurityDreamer, carving our unique niche in the industry. Here is a taste of our findings. Sorry, the complete findings are not available except to Steve Hunt’s consulting clients and participants in the research.

Methodology

I find that narratives yield more insight and are more accurate than statistics. Therefore, the SecurityDreamer approach is to conduct dozens of personal interviews, by phone, email or in person. Each interview covers a subset of topics. Data gathered is generally qualitative and anecdotal, rather than quantitative.

Topics Included

Awareness

Budgeting/Spending

Business Continuity

Consultants, Use of

Event Management

Executive Buy-in

Identity & Access Management

Identity Theft

Interdepartmental Collaboration

Operational Best Practices

Penetration Testing

Physical Information Protection

Social Engineering

Staffing/Headcount

Strategy & Planning

Technology Lifecycle Management

Technology Selection

Approximately 50 companies participated in the survey, representing 11 industries.

Industry

%

Energy

19

Finance

16

Business Svcs

14

Online Merchants

13

Banking

8

Healthcare

8

Retail

6

High-Tech

6

HighTech

4

Entertainment

3

Food&Hospitality

3

 

security_dreamer_high-res_4c

Summary Findings from the SecurityDreamer Research

Increased Spending

While operational security budgets saw little growth across all industries, spending for new projects increased steadily in Energy, Finance, High-Tech and Entertainment. New IT security and physical security projects most notably included

  • Security operations centers
  • Virtual command centers
  • Security information management systems (SIEM, PSIM)
  • Networked cameras and sensors at high-risk facilities

Greatest Challenge

CSOs and CISOs complained that their greatest business challenge is metrics: Normal operational metrics, such as improved response time to security incidents, or numbers of malicious code detections are not compelling to business leaders. Security executives seek better ways to calculate ROI, justify purchases, and measure the success of deployments.

Most Surprising finding of 2012

Collecting Company Wisdom. Far more companies in more industries are documenting processes than we’ve seen in previous surveys.  Continual Improvement (a la Baldrige, Kaizen, Six Sigma, etc) appears to be the primary motivation. Security executives realize that much of the know how of security operations resides in the heads of its local security managers. In a hope to benefit from the sharing of this business intelligence, companies are using a variety of techniques (surveys, performance reviews, online forms) to gather it.

Least Aware of This Threat

Physical threats to information rose to the top of the list of issues about which CISOs and CSOs know the least.  Every security executive we interviewed had an understanding of physical threats to information (unauthorized visitors, dumpster diving, etc) but almost none had studied or measured the risks associated with physical threats to information, nor did they have in place thorough procedures to protect against it.

Least Prepared for This Threat

Two related concepts represent the threat for which nearly all security executives feel least prepared to address: Social engineering and physical penetration.  Every security executive confessed that confidential company information was as risk of social engineer attacks (phony phone conversations, pre-texting, impersonation, spear-phishing, etc.).  Physical penetrations were even more frightening to some executives who were certain that their confidential company information could be collected and conveyed out of the building (in the form of printed documents, photos, memory sticks, etc) by

  • an unauthorized visitor tailgating into the building
  • an attacker bypassing security controls at doors and fences
  • rogue employees or contractors
  • an internal attacker of any type

security_dreamer_high-res_4c

Security is not the point!

February 5, 2013 17 comments

Articulating the Value of Security…

It’s an uphill battle to convince the decision-makers in any business that they need to invest in security. Why? Because deep down, all professional businesspeople think security is an annoying layer of cost and inconvenience.

If you walk in and tell them, “We need more security,” they hear, “We need a more annoying layer of cost and inconvenience.”

Getting the buy-in for security products and services today means understanding what drives your company’s security purchase decisions—basically, what is going on in the mind of your bosses. Fear, uncertainty and doubt are not the cleverest tools to use anymore. The security industry is undergoing changes as it adjusts to the convergence of IT with physical security, and businesses are changing, too. Now businesses want something that sometimes seems like a foreign concept to the security profession: value. If you don’t adapt and start answering the questions your business is really interested in, you’ll never get the green light on new projects and upgrades.

Remember, nobody wants security; they want the benefits of security. That means that the housewife doesn’t want the finest deadbolt on the front door because of the excellence of its engineering or its impact resistance. She wants a comfortable, happy place to raise her family.

Businesses also want something other than security. If a bank manager has a mandate to reduce expenses related to bank tellers, she has a couple of options. She could fire all the tellers and lock up all the bank branches, but then the bank would have no interface with its customers. Or she could take all the money, put it in piles on the street corner under a clipboard that says, “Take what you want, but write it down so we may balance your account.” That wouldn’t work either, obviously.

The best solution for reducing teller expenses is to take the money, put in on the street corner locked in a box with a computer attached, and give customers a plastic card for authentication and auditing.

Security was never the point. The bank had a business objective and achieved it by using some security. That is how we all should think of security: as a way of helping our companies achieve the goals or value they seek.

Business managers, especially executives at the highest levels of an organization, have a very simple view of security: It is a tool in the corporate toolbox for enabling business. But they don’t even think of it as security.

The manager responsible for an online ecommerce business wants a few things. He wants to know who is using his Web site. He wants to ensure that each one can do everything on that site they need to do. He has a lot of people doing a lot of things, so he needs an easy way to manage it. And at the end of the day or the end of the quarter, he needs a report that tells him what has happened so he can improve customer satisfaction, reduce errors and increase profits.

In that example we have all four fundamental categories of security—authentication, authorization, administration and audit—but the manager doesn’t think of security once! That’s because security is not the point.

Focus on Value

I have suggested many times that, whenever possible, security professionals should purge the word “security” from their vocabulary. Instead, answer the questions inside your boss’s head, and don’t simply spout the ways security keeps bad things from happening.

Your upper management thinks in terms of money, not security. What people will be needed? What headcount can we reduce? How much will it cost? How much will we save? What new revenue can we earn as a result of this investment? And they think not in terms of security risks, but in terms of credit risk, market risks and operational risks. That’s where you can shine.

One U.S. company spent $35 million on physical security upgrades after 9-11, and $4 million on IT security upgrades. Last fall they failed their Sarbanes-Oxley audit because of poor security. How? Visitors were given a badge for the day, but they could still walk unescorted past cubicles with unattended computers logged into financial systems. At that moment the audit no longer had confidence in the integrity of the numbers. Anyone could have moved a decimal point or added a zero.

If you know your facilities need more security, tell your managers how it will help them measure or achieve compliance to regulations like Sarbanes-Oxley: You audit employee behavior, or lock up financial systems, or shred financial documents, or do background checks, or secure backup tapes. For any business problem, you should be prepared to help your management identify the ways that the authentication, authorization, administration or audit solutions you’re proposing will solve their problem, or help customers make the gains they hope for.

Remember, it is not our job to secure the building. Our job is to secure the business. 

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